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When I was studying for my CELPIP exam I got material from them. Unfortunately, I can not put the PDF to the public because it has a watermark with my personal email. But I can put you here what it says.

CELPIP's sixth error as they state:

Misplaced modifiers are modifying words, phrases, or clauses whose ineffective position in the sentence leads to unintentionally unclear or absurd meanings: The customers are buying helmets that want to play hockey. The writer means that the customers want to play hockey, but the sentence says the helmets want to play hockey. To fix the problem, we place the adjective clause nearer to the noun it modifies: The customers that want to play hockey are buying helmets.

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When I was studying for my CELPIP exam I got material from them. Unfortunately, I can not put the PDF to the public because it has a watermark with my personal email. But I can put you here what it says.

CELPIP's seventh error as they state:

Often an introductory element, a dangling modifier doesn’t logically refer to anything mentioned in the sentence; it modifies something that’s not stated: Growing up in a creative family, an art career is an option. (Who is growing up? Surely not the art career, but an unmentioned person.) We can’t repair dangling modifiers by moving them; we must rewrite the sentence. One solution is to mention the actor in the main clause, right next to the dangling modifier. Growing up in a creative family, Noah has the option of an art career. A second solution is to add the actor to the dangling modifier: Since he is growing up in a creative family, Noah has the option of an art career.

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When I was studying for my CELPIP exam I got material from them. Unfortunately, I can not put the PDF to the public because it has a watermark with my personal email. But I can put you here what it says.

CELPIP's eighth error as they state:

A common CELPIP error is using pronouns that do not agree with the nouns they refer to (i.e., their antecedents). Pronouns and their antecedents need to agree. We say, “Return the books when they are due.” The pronoun they agree with its antecedent noun books in person (both are the third person) and number (both are plural).

In fact, pronouns can agree with their antecedents in four ways:

  • Person: first, second, or third
  • Number: singular or plural
  • Case: subjective, objective, possessive, or reflexive
  • Gender: masculine, feminine, either, or neuter