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When I was studying for my CELPIP exam I got material from them. Unfortunately, I can not put the PDF to the public because it has a watermark with my personal email. But I can put you here what it says.

CELPIP's eighteenth error as they state:

A common CELPIP error is failing to use a period when necessary, which leads to run-on sentences (see Unit 2: Run-On Sentences) and a confused reader. A test taker who is unable to use periods effectively may produce responses that are harder to read and that may not communicate ideas clearly and effectively, resulting in a lower rating. A test taker also needs to be careful to use question marks in true questions only and to limit their use of exclamation marks to sentences where it is appropriate to communicate surprise, shock, or other strong emotions.

celpip-results.png

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After about 10 natural days, I got an email saying my exam results are ready. So I went immediately to review. All was good, I got minimum English qualifications for the NOC career I have. If you have a NOC A or 0 careers, your minimum qualification must be 7 in the CLB scale in all competencies.

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When I was studying for my CELPIP exam I got material from them. Unfortunately, I can not put the PDF to the public because it has a watermark with my personal email. But I can put you here what it says.

CELPIP's third error as they state:

Some word groups ending in periods aren’t really sentences; they’re sentence fragments, lacking what it takes to stand alone. A sentence (1) must have at least one independent clause with a subject and a finite verb (i.e., one that shows tense) and (2) must not start with a subordinating word that makes it a dependent clause. (See “Beware,” below.) A dependent clause cannot stand alone as a sentence; it must be attached to an independent clause. Similarly, a phrase of any kind must be attached to an independent clause.

To fix a fragment, we often attach it to the sentence before or after it, perhaps with a comma. Sometimes we have to rewrite the fragment.

A subordinating conjunction placed at the start of an independent clause makes that clause dependent, unable to stand alone.

  • Dependent: Since I will get back to you tomorrow.
  • Independent: I will get back to you tomorrow.

Subordinating conjunctions include because, since, (al)though, even though, if, unless, when(ever), while, until, where(ever), (every/any)where, whereas, and others. The relative pronouns which, that, who, and whom also subordinate a clause.

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