User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

When I was studying for my CELPIP exam I got material from them. Unfortunately, I can not put the PDF to the public because it has a watermark with my personal email. But I can put you here what it says.

CELPIP's third error as they state:

Some word groups ending in periods aren’t really sentences; they’re sentence fragments, lacking what it takes to stand alone. A sentence (1) must have at least one independent clause with a subject and a finite verb (i.e., one that shows tense) and (2) must not start with a subordinating word that makes it a dependent clause. (See “Beware,” below.) A dependent clause cannot stand alone as a sentence; it must be attached to an independent clause. Similarly, a phrase of any kind must be attached to an independent clause.

To fix a fragment, we often attach it to the sentence before or after it, perhaps with a comma. Sometimes we have to rewrite the fragment.

A subordinating conjunction placed at the start of an independent clause makes that clause dependent, unable to stand alone.

  • Dependent: Since I will get back to you tomorrow.
  • Independent: I will get back to you tomorrow.

Subordinating conjunctions include because, since, (al)though, even though, if, unless, when(ever), while, until, where(ever), (every/any)where, whereas, and others. The relative pronouns which, that, who, and whom also subordinate a clause.

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

When I was studying for my CELPIP exam I got material from them. Unfortunately, I can not put the PDF to the public because it has a watermark with my personal email. But I can put you here what it says.

CELPIP's first error as they state:

A common CELPIP error is using the wrong grammatical form of a word—that is, mixing up nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs. An example is using a noun form (such as beauty) when you need the adjective form (beautiful). (Canada is a beauty beautiful country.) As shown below, a word’s required grammatical form depends on its function in a sentence.

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

When I was studying for my CELPIP exam I got material from them. Unfortunately, I can not put the PDF to the public because it has a watermark with my personal email. But I can put you here what it says.

CELPIP's fifth error as they state:

The relative pronoun which used by itself refers to things or animals, but in which (formal) and where (less formal) can refer to places, e.g., countries, cities, buildings, and rooms (the office where [or in which] I work). We can also use where and in which with some abstract nouns like situation, activity, case, example, experience, system, and society. (This is a case where [or in which] caution is recommended.)

A common source of confusion is the difference between using a relative pronoun as the clauses' subject and using it as the clause’s object. We don’t use whereas the subject of an adjective clause:

This is the bank. The bank accepts my cheques. NOT: This is the bank where accepts my chequesIn adjective clauses, where can be used as the object: This is the bank. I deposit my cheques here. This is the bank where I deposit my cheques.

The relative pronoun which can be either the clauses' subject (the cheque which bounced) or its object (the cheque which I deposited). As a subject, that is more common than which.