It is not new that many people are searching for the not very new codec G.729. Since this year (please google it), the codec G.729 is not under patent, therefore you can use it without paying patent fees. This is a huge step for the VoIP work, why? Because the G.729 codec offers many advantages, one of them is the low bandwidth requirement; it needs about 11 kbps up and down each. If you think it, the less bandwidth required, it means your service will be more tolerant to the overuse of links. It is very common that in an office or a residence, more than one is watching any kind of streaming or downloading a big file.

Because of this, I think it is very important to tell the world how to install G.729 on your FreeSWITCH server.


Although the word predictive dialer is kind of fussy, some may think it is something that guesses the number you are dialling, but the truth it is quite another thing. A predictive dialer is just a dialer that has a pre-loaded list of numbers to dial; predictive it is just because you know what is the next number.

Last week, I have published in OKay's RPM repository RPMs for FreeSWITCH 1.6.20. FreeSWITCH is a complete VoIP switch that works on many platforms, including Centos 6 and Centos 7. This is one of the biggest packages I have ever done; there are more than 1800 hours of work behind to make it work (mainly because of the CentOS 6 support). When updating, you will notice it will download many libraries, most part of them not available anywhere.

The big difference on my RPM's is there are more sub-packages, for example, you can install only freeswitch-cli if you only need fs_cli command; Centos 6 RPMS for 32 and 64 bits are available with video support; I have imported a patch that fixes mod_nibblebill, in some situations leg b won't hang up and it will produce money losses. I have been updating some other dependencies such as VLC, OpenH264 and MPG123 with latest stable if you were using my RPM's you will notice more updates as well. Since the RPM of the 1.6.15 release, I have published the sounds for en-ca-june, the Canadian English language. If you live in Canada and you have done English exams such as CELPIP, you will notice those little differences.

In addition, these RPM's have a patch that allows the console to filter by a regular expression. If you do VoIP debugging, you will understand right away what I am talking about.

Because libyuv is now part of the core, these RPMs are compiled with video support. Yes, you read it well, both Centos 6 and 7 with video support.

Since this release, my RPM is going to be linked against tcmalloc.