This week is the Ethereum week for me. I know, without doing this on purpose, I have written many posts that are related to the Ethereum subject one way or other. As i have successfully put my Ethereum node that manages 10+ workers (aka Ethereum Rig), as I have expressed by releasing my Ethereum Nagios Plugins, it is to know when something is not working as expected. Literally, the time is money. Of course, there are many websites where you can monitor your node, but it is not practical to have a web page always opened, not to mention you are not always in front of the computer. Then, having a Nagios deployment that rings when something goes wrong, it's the best option for me. And I hope for any serious system administrator.

In this article, I will explain how to configure you already working Nagios. I will assume the following:

  • You already have a Nagios working
  • You know Nagios enough to change the configurations to fit your needs
  • You have a way to get alarms from your Nagios, SMS or mobile application

As you have seen, I have been doing RPM's for CentOS for quite a time. Today, I am publishing the RPMs for Go-Ethereum 1.4.13. All you need to do is to add my OKay's RPM repository, and just install it.

RPM's are available for Centos 6 and 7. And you can find it if you type yum search go-ethereum.

 

Today I have just published in the OKay's RPM repository RPMs for cpp-ethereum 1.3. It is the third most popular of the Ethereum clients, behind geth (the go client) and Parity (the rust client). The code is exceptionallyportable and has been used successfully on a very broad range of operating systems and hardware.

Unfortunately, I won't be able to do RPM's for CentOS 6. Since I have done a lot of package backporting, there is a linking/include library problem I am not able to solve.

RPM's are available for Centos 6 and 7. And you can find it if you type yum search cpp-ethereum.

Enjoy!

Today I had a request to enable transcoding in one PBX. For those who are not familiar, transcoding allows different legs to use its own codec. You can thin on transcoding as a translating service. Each codec is a different language and FreeSWITCH works as a translator.Using transcoding is good if you have some endpoints with very little bandwidth (using a cheap codec such as 729, SILK or, GSM saves bandwidth). However, you must know that transcoding is CPU hungry, this means, the more you transcode the more CPU will be requested, and this may backfire in some scenarios.

Using transcoding is good if you have some endpoints with very little bandwidth (using a cheap codec such as 729 , SILK or, GSM saves bandwidth). However, you must know that transcoding is CPU hungry, this means, the more you transcode the more CPU will be requested, and this may backfire in some scenarios.

I will explain how I made the transcoding work.

Today I have just published in the OKay's RPM repository RPMs for llibjson-rpc-cpp. This framework provides cross platform JSON-RPC (remote procedure call) support for C++. It is fully JSON-RPC 2.0 & 1.0 compatible.

Cpp-Ethereum 1.3.0 needs libjson-rpc-cpp. This is the first step of many to have a working and nice RPM for cpp-ethereum. Stay tunned!

RPM's are available for Centos 6 and 7. And you can find it if you type yum search libjson-rpc-cpp.

Enjoy!

Cpp-Ethereum 1.3.0 RPMs for Mageia Cauldron (6) are now available since today. This is a C++ client. It is the third most popular of the Ethereum clients, behind geth (the go client) and Parity (the rust client). The code is exceptionally portable and has been used successfully on a very broad range of operating systems and hardware.

Cpp-Ethereum is able to do GPU mining, which it allows to get more hash power. This RPM is compiled against the open source version of OpenCL and it is linked against FGLRX (Radeon GPU cards). If you want to take advantage of all your GPU power, you will need to create the OpenCL proprietary RPM (unfortunately, licensing does not allow RPM distribution). You can download the SPEC file from the SPECS for Mageia project (which I put RPM definitions that are not allowed to be distributable).

As part of my commitment with Mageia, I will try to keep this package as updated as possible. The team from Syncthing are very responsive and they release new versions very often. At the time when writing this article, Mageia Cauldron 6 is in version freeze; this means we will need to wait for a little until the big system administrators let the new RPM in. This package is GPL licensed, but since it needs non-free distributable software it is available in the non-free Mageia repository; you should enable it before installing anything. If you want to run this in Mageia 5, you can read my article about how to compile a GPU Etherum miner under Mageia.

You will need to install the -devel packages until I figure out a correct patch to allow major utilization.

RPM's are available for Mageia Cauldron (6), I will be working to backport to Mageia 5 as soon as possible. You can install it if you type urpmi cpp-ethereum

Enjoy!

Today I got a comment from a dear customer: I don't see rsync crontab. And I told him: There is no rsync, we use CSync2. He currently has a Load balanced FusionPBX cluster with two VoIP servers with file synchronization. Servers verify each other each two minutes. And I must say, it is really nice.

In this post, I am going to describe how to configure and how to do a simple config.

Since some weeks ago, I got the decision to start in the cryptocurrency business (also known as digital currencies). There are many of them, some of them I didn't know they exist. The most popular one is the Bitcoin. Sadly, Bitcoin mining business is now out of scope for the most part of the users (including myself). As time passes, it is more and more difficult to complete a block. You need more and more powerful devices to have the enough hashing power. Today, using ASIC devices with 4 Tera hash/sec are not enough. Because of this reason, Bitcoin is not my selected option.

Ethereum is another crypto-currency that has been getting popularity. The Etherum is more than a cryptocurrency, it is used for digital contracts as well. Anyway, the good think about the Ethereum is that the hashing algorithm (scrypt) is memory hungry, gladly this makes almost impossible the design of ASIC devices which it allows end users to be in the game.

In this article, I am going to describe how to setup the software (not how to use it) using Mageia Linux. You need to know there is a distribution called EthOS (Debian based) which saves you all this time, but it is not for free and you won't learn all the science that it is behind.