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So it was about time, and I had to renew my old trust Acer V5 15" i5 Laptop. After digging and digging I decided to get an HP OMEN 17.3" i7-8750H Laptop. Although it is hardware built for gamers, the fact that it has 12 CPU cores makes it really attractive for coders and people who need power for other things than playing.

I will write here how I managed to make it work almost flawlessly under Linux Mageia 7.

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Sofia is the most famous library to deal with SIP protocol. SIP Protocol is one of the most famous protocols used in VoIP for signalling and of course, used by FreeSWITCH. Since FreeSWITCH 1.10.4, sofia-lib is not shipped in the tarball, instead, it will use the system library.

The Sofia-SIP RPM for CentOS 7 and CentOS 8 is now available. Sofia SIP is an RFC-3261-compliant library for SIP user agents and other network elements.  The Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) is an application-layer control (signalling) protocol for creating, modifying, and terminating sessions with one or more participants. These sessions include Internet telephone calls, multimedia distribution, and multimedia conferences.

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HTTP/2 (originally named HTTP/2.0) is a major revision of the HTTP network protocol used by the World Wide Web. It was derived from the earlier experimental SPDY protocol, originally developed by Google. HTTP/2 was developed by the Hypertext Transfer Protocol working group httpbis (where bis means "second") of the Internet Engineering Task Force. HTTP/2 is the first new version of HTTP since HTTP 1.1, which was standardized in RFC 2068 in 1997. The Working Group presented HTTP/2 to IESG for consideration as a Proposed Standard in December 2014, and IESG approved it to publish as Proposed Standard on February 17, 2015. The HTTP/2 specification was published as RFC 7540 in May 2015.

The standardization effort was supported by Chrome, Opera, Firefox, Internet Explorer 11, Safari, Amazon Silk, and Edge browsers. Most major browsers had added HTTP/2 support by the end of 2015.

According to W3Techs, as of November 2018, 31.8% of the top 10 million websites supported HTTP/2.