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Twilio is one complete VoIP carriers these days. Among its SMS capabilities, it provides sip trunks as well. The good or bad thing about Twilio is that its SIP trunk only works with SSL/TLS. This will help you to warrant your confidentiality but it needs more work from you to make it work. I will talk about how I did it.

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I currently have an ISPConfig3 cluster running on different VPS'es for my company. ISPConfig3 is very nice, I can handle within the same interface the websites, databases, accounts and mail. My cluster runs perfectly, however when I start having a lot of hits because of visitors to my webpages or because of SPAM the daemons start forking and as a consequence, the operative system swaps and all go slow.

I was then looking for a solution that doesn't involve adding more resources to the servers. After analyzing how ISPConfig 3 deploys the daemons in my Linux CentOS 7, I figure out that taking out amavisd, clamd and postgrey will help a lot.

Why these two daemons? Well, there are two big reasons. The first one is because email anti-spam and the greylist filtering service are a common task; there is no need to have multiple daemons doing the same. And the second and most important is that they are in perl, and according to my readings, perl has a huge footprint. I don't have the document, but I remember I read somewhere each perl process uses 16BM of RAM. So, moving out these two daemons, I potentially will free at least 64 MB in each server. I am not sure how many RAM does clamd use.

So, I will describe what I have done.

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HTTP/2 (originally named HTTP/2.0) is a major revision of the HTTP network protocol used by the World Wide Web. It was derived from the earlier experimental SPDY protocol, originally developed by Google. HTTP/2 was developed by the Hypertext Transfer Protocol working group httpbis (where bis means "second") of the Internet Engineering Task Force. HTTP/2 is the first new version of HTTP since HTTP 1.1, which was standardized in RFC 2068 in 1997. The Working Group presented HTTP/2 to IESG for consideration as a Proposed Standard in December 2014, and IESG approved it to publish as Proposed Standard on February 17, 2015. The HTTP/2 specification was published as RFC 7540 in May 2015.

The standardization effort was supported by Chrome, Opera, Firefox, Internet Explorer 11, Safari, Amazon Silk, and Edge browsers. Most major browsers had added HTTP/2 support by the end of 2015.

According to W3Techs, as of November 2018, 31.8% of the top 10 million websites supported HTTP/2.